Program

Applications are due by January 15 for admission to September.

ProgramExpected LengthProject and/or thesisCourse based
LLM16 months

The LLM program is thesis-based, offering supervision in a wide range of areas, including:

  • Aboriginal law and indigenous peoples' rights
  • Administration of justice
  • Administrative and municipal law
  • Bankruptcy and insolvency
  • Business organizations and corporate law
  • Commercial law (domestic and international)
  • Contract law
  • Constitutional law
  • Criminal law
  • Dispute resolution
  • Environmental, natural resources and resource
  • development, and agricultural law
  • Evidence
  • Family law
  • Gender law and policy
  • Health, disability, and elder law
  • Human rights
  • International trade and investment law
  • Labour and employment law
  • Legal education
  • Legal ethics and the legal profession
  • Legal history
  • Legal theory
  • Poverty, law, and access to justice
  • Private international law
  • Property law
  • Public international law
  • Sexual assault law and policy
  • Secured financing law
  • Tax law and policy
  • Tort law
  • Trusts and wills

It is a full-time program and extends for about 12-16 months, with a 12-month residency requirement.

Entry to the program is limited to ensure a supportive and collegial environment that affords students with quality time with faculty supervisors and opportunities for close engagement with the academic life of the college. Generous funding support is available, including scholarships for highly qualified students and travel grants to support students who travel for their thesis research or to present their work at national and international conferences. A wide range of courses as well as faculty seminars and guest lectures in the College of Law and throughout the University are open to graduate students. As well, our college provides its graduate students with office space and opportunities to get involved in teaching and research at the College of Law.

Research supervisors

It is not necessary to find a potential supervisor before you begin an application. The list below though may be helpful to learn about the research interests of our faculty.

Name Research areas
Beth BilsonAdministrative and municipal law; labour and employment law; legal history
Sarah BuhlerLegal education; legal ethics and the legal profession; poverty, law, and access to justice
Mark CarterConstitutional law; criminal law; human rights
Brent CotterLegal ethics and the legal profession
Ron C.C. CumingBankruptcy and insolvency; commercial law (domestic and international); private international law; secured financing law
Patricia FarneseEnvironmental, natural resources and resource development, and agricultural law; health, disability, and elder law; property law
Robin HansenBusiness organizations and corporate law; international trade and investment law; private international law
Heather HeavinBusiness organizations and corporate law; commercial law; contract law; dispute resolution; international trade and investment law
James (Sákéj) Youngblood HendersonAboriginal law; constitutional law; international human rights law
Felix HoehnAdministrative and municipal law; property law; aboriginal law and indigenous peoples rights
Michaela KeetDispute resolution
William A. (Bill) KerrPrimary competitiveness & productivity; functional food processing; bio-energy/bio-product development; innovation systems analysis
John KleefeldDispute resolution; legal education; tort law
Tamara LarreHealth, disability, and elder law; tax law and policy
Glen LutherAboriginal law & indigenous peoples rights; administration of justice; constitutional law; criminal law; dispute resolution; evidence; legal education
Dwight NewmanAboriginal law and indigenous peoples rights; constitutional law; legal theory; private international law
Ibironke Odumosu-AyanuBusiness & corporate law; contract law; environmental, natural resources & resource development & agricultural law; international trade & investment
Martin PhillipsonEnvironmental, natural resources and resource development, and agricultural law; property law
Michael PlaxtonCriminal law; evidence; legal ethics and the legal profession; legal theory
Douglas SurteesContract law; health, disability, and elder law; human rights; legal education
Lucinda VandervortAdministration of justice; administrative & municipal law; criminal law; evidence; health, disability, & elder law
Barbara von TigerstromAdministrative and municipal law; health, disability, & elder law; international trade & investment law; public international law
Wanda WiegersFamily law; gender law and policy; legal theory; poverty, law, and access to justice

Tuition and funding

Funding

Many factors are involved in assessing funding assistance and the amount of available funding varies from year to year. If you are accepted to our LLM program, the College of Law Graduate Committee will provide information to you regarding the amount of funding you may expect. LL.M. Scholarships range between $10,000 - $20,000 per year and the committee makes every effort to provide funding assistance according to the available resources. The online application asks you to indicate if funding will be required; at the time of application no other documentation or scholarship application is required.

In addition to potential funding from your department, there are scholarships and awards available to all eligible students. There are also special programs for international students from China, Vietnam, and Ecuador.

Tuition

Graduate students in a thesis or project based program pay tuition three times a year for as long as they are enrolled in their program.

Term Canadian International
September 1 - December 31, 2016 $1300.00 $1950.00
January 1 - April 30, 2017 $1300.00 $1950.00
May 1 - August 31, 2017 $1300.00 $1950.00
Total per academic year $3900.00 $5850.00

Tuition information is accurate for the current academic year and does not include student fees. For detailed tuition and fees information, visit the official tuition website.

Admission requirements

Master of Laws

  • A Juris Doctor or Bachelor of Laws degree, or equivalent, from a recognized college or university
  • A cumulative weighted average of at least 70% (U of S grade system equivalent) in the last two years of study (e.g. 60 credit units)
  • Proof of English language proficiency may be required for international applicants and for applicants whose first language is not English

Application process

Submit an online application

Once you begin an application, choose the following application forms in the system:

  • Graduate (B) Fall term start - September

During the application, you'll be asked for:

  • Personal information such as your name, address, etc.
  • The names and email addresses of your three referees
  • Your educational history from all post-secondary institutions you've attended

The application takes about 20 minutes to complete. You may save your application and return to it later as long as you remember the Login ID and PIN you've created.

At the end of the application, you will need to pay a non-refundable $90 application fee. It is recommended that you pay online with a credit card. If you do not pay online when completing your application, you will need to use an alternate form of payment. Your application will not be processed until payment is received.

If you are a past or current student you may begin an application in the admissions channel of PAWS.

Submitting required documents

Once you've completed an online application you will need to have the following documents submitted:

  • You will need to send in official transcripts of all previous undergraduate and graduate courses (including, where necessary, a certified English translation), even if a degree was not awarded. You do not need to submit transcripts for courses taken at the U of S.
  • Have the transcripts sent directly from the institutions to the department address below.
  • If your current degree is still in progress, you will need to arrange for your official final transcripts showing the awarding of your degree to be sent to your department.
  • Copies of transcripts are not acceptable as final admission documents, unless they have also been verified and stamped by your issuing institution.

If you are required to provide proof of English proficiency your English test results need to be sent directly from the organization where your tests were taken to the department address below.

In addition to the above official documents, send the following to the program office listed below by email:

  • CV (resume)
  • Personal statement: explain your reasons for pursuing an LLM, how your background prepared you to succeed in a rigorous academic program, and your objectives in completing the degree
  • Research proposal: 2-5 pages describing: 1) the specific topic or area of legal research you propose to explore in your thesis; 2) the jurisprudence or literature that provides the foundation for your proposal (i.e. what work has already been done on this topic and how would your research build on it? What is the body of legal material that you will use to complete your thesis research?); 3) outline your proposed research question and the research you plan to complete to investigate this question.
  • Sample of academic writing: this should be 20-50 pages in length and must have been writing by you alone in English. Ideally this will be a published article or law school research paper. If an English language article is not available the Graduate committee will consider your application on the basis of your proposal alone.

Contact

College of Law
15 Campus Drive
University of Saskatchewan
Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A6

Graduate Chair
Prof. Heather Heavin
Email: law_graddirector@usask.ca

Graduate Program Contact
Email: law_gradstudies@usask.ca